Chinatown Offers Little Green Space

Written by Xin Fang

Xin Fang
BU News Services

“There’re not many green places in Chinatown,” Lee Kee said.

Kee, 68, is a retired employee of a nearby Asian supermarket.

Lee Kee, left, 72, a retiree, Chung-Chi Che, right, 68, a retired veteran and former chief of MBTA Green Line, are both volunteers of Boston Chinatown Crime Watch.

Lee Kee, left, 72, a retiree, Chung-Chi Che, right, 68, a retired veteran and former chief of MBTA Green Line, are both volunteers of Boston Chinatown Crime Watch.

Mary Soo Hoo Park, a tiny open space adjacent to the Chinatown Gate, is one of the few places residents can gather outdoors. It abuts the Rose Kennedy Greenway, which older Chinatown residents said is much nicer than the old highway that once ran through their neighborhood.

“The City of Boston has planted plenty of maidenhair trees in Chinatown, including the park,” Lee said. “The maidenhair trees can absorb the polluted air emission from traffic, which helps.”

Mary Soo Hoo Park, the largest recreational park in Chinatown

Mary Soo Hoo Park is the largest recreational park in Chinatown.

Mary Soo Hoo Park attracts many elderly Chinese residents who play chess and cards with friends. It provides a perfect place for old friends to gather.

“There’re several Cantonese pastry stores near the park, and that probably counts as a reason for its popularity,” Lee said.

At night, Lee volunteers for the Boston Chinatown Crime Watch.

“The A-1 district of the Boston Police will assign officers to patrol this area,” Larry Young said.

Young is a former journalist of Sing Dao Daily.

“Also, we feel safe when there’s a car with a BPD’s logo that parks near the Chinatown Gate,” Young said.

 

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